Grammar Tweets

Need grammar advice in 140 characters or less? Check out ThatWhichMatter ( @thatwhichmatter ) on Twitter for helpful grammar hints. Because sometimes it helps to be reminded whether “between” or “among” is more appropriate in your context before you ask the question.

Hat tip to Lifehacker.

Typing Class – iPhone Edition

Mechanical desktop typewriters, such as this U...
Image via Wikipedia

I learned how to type on a manual typewriter. You had to press those suckers to make an impression. It wasn’t haptic feedback, it was more like haptic bludgeoning.  Studio readers probably have an inkling or two about my feelings regarding typing on the iPhone. It’s like the anti-Smith Corona.

Enter this truly useful post from Art of the iPhone with some great typing tips for working your way around that sheet of glass that passes for a keyboard. Learn the ins and outs of quick edits with cut, copy and paste, typing in landscape (o.k., that’s a duh tip), sliding fingers for quick punctuation and numbers, typing accents, dashes and other special characters, quick-contractions, using auto-correction as an efficiency aid, avoiding auto-correction when you don’t want it, dropping the .com, changing keyboard settings, and shaking to undo your last action and enabling emoji (those cute little icons and smileys in messages).

And if you really get frustrated with the keyboard, just give it up and check out Art of the iPhone’s helpful tips on voice control commands.

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One-Stop Legal Tech Shopping

2006_12_04_RLNPost_Zivley_W
Image by vaXzine via Flickr

Ken Strutin at LLRX has collected a list of resources for librarians to assist them in assisting others with employing new technologies in the practice of law. Insert “lawyers” for “librarians” and the list becomes even more worthwhile. There are some old favorites on this list, as well as a few new resources. He breaks the list of resources into categories, such as current awareness (of tech equipment and services), Web Tech 2.0, website monitoring, citation tools, and communication management.

It is by no means exhaustive, but certainly adds a few tips so it is worth a check.

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One-Stop Legal Tech Shopping

2006_12_04_RLNPost_Zivley_W
Image by vaXzine via Flickr

Ken Strutin at LLRX has collected a list of resources for librarians to assist them in assisting others with employing new technologies in the practice of law. Insert “lawyers” for “librarians” and the list becomes even more worthwhile. There are some old favorites on this list, as well as a few new resources. He breaks the list of resources into categories, such as current awareness (of tech equipment and services), Web Tech 2.0, website monitoring, citation tools, and communication management.

It is by no means exhaustive, but certainly adds a few tips so it is worth a check.

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Graphing The Day

Bureau of Labor Statistics
Image via Wikipedia

Now this is really fascinating, particularly if you drill down into the various categories across different groups. The New York Times published this interactive graph on July 31, 2009 which shows how people over the age of 15 spend their day. The graph is compiled with information culled in 2008 by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and purports to show results for “thousands” of people. The chart morphs when you select a group: everyone; men; women; employed; unemployed; not in the labor force; white; black; hispanic; age group; educational level; and number of children. When you scroll over the results, greater detail on the particular band pops up, changing as you move through the day.

I find interesting the breakdown on the chart between “work”, “household activities” and “family care.” Seems there might be some overlap there. There are also categories for: eating and drinking; assorted services; shopping; education; job search; nonfamily care; traveling; phone calls; volunteering; religious activities; sports; computer use; tv and movies (a shocking chunk); relaxing and thinking; socializing; other leisure; personal care; and sleeping. Oh, and my personal favorite “I can’t remember.”

Very interesting breakdown, indeed.

Hat tip to Feminist Law Professors.

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