Are Information Flow & Writing Flow Mutually Exclusive?

I have heard the arguments for how the Information Superhighway detracts from and degrades the writing process. Ken Purdy at Lifehacker relays how one prolific writer, Cory Doctorow of BoingBoing, keeps his taps open to both information input and written content output. I thought his points were worthy of a re-quote:

Researching isn’t writing and vice-versa. When you come to a factual matter that you could google in a matter of seconds, don’t. Don’t give in and look up the length of the Brooklyn Bridge, the population of Rhode Island, or the distance to the Sun. That way lies distraction — an endless click-trance that will turn your 20 minutes of composing into a half-day’s idyll through the web. Instead, do what journalists do: type "TK" where your fact should go, as in "The Brooklyn bridge, all TK feet of it, sailed into the air like a kite." "TK" appears in very few English words (the one I get tripped up on is "Atkins") so a quick search through your document for "TK" will tell you whether you have any fact-checking to do afterwards. And your editor and copyeditor will recognize it if you miss it and bring it to your attention.

Lawyers and writers take note: embrace the flood of information and use your organizational skills to master it and still produce!

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Words Schmerds! Fun With Linguistic Reduplication

I really enjoy Good / blog for general-purpose, intelligent news. But today, my RSS feed included an article that borders on my particular interest: words! Author Mark Peters explores the linguistic concept of repetitious words or “reduplication” (is that redundant?) in his article Woo-hoo! Linguistic Reduplication!. I love his list of word-types and expressions and strongly suggest you hit the jump above. But best of all, I love the picture that he posts with the article of Mr. T: It’s all Jibba Jabba, fool!

Legal Encyclopedias – Free and On-Line!

Law Library – Free and On-Lin Legal Information maintains a free, searchable, legal encyclopedia here. The encyclopedia is powered by JRank, a Java search engine that permits the user control of when and how their spider visits a site and how the site is included in their index. I wasn’t able to verify how solid the results are, but I imagine it could be used in a general, introductory sort of way in conjunction with other resources to flesh out an on-line research project.

Thanks to the Adjunct Law Prof Blog for the heads up.

Legal Encyclopedias – Free and On-Line!

Law Library – Free and On-Lin Legal Information maintains a free, searchable, legal encyclopedia here. The encyclopedia is powered by JRank, a Java search engine that permits the user control of when and how their spider visits a site and how the site is included in their index. I wasn’t able to verify how solid the results are, but I imagine it could be used in a general, introductory sort of way in conjunction with other resources to flesh out an on-line research project.

Thanks to the Adjunct Law Prof Blog for the heads up.

How Timely! A Comparison of On-Line Tax Resources

Katherine Pratt, Jennifer Kowal and Daniel Martin have authored this article, The Virtual Tax Library:A Comparison of Five Electronic Tax
Research Platforms,
through Loyola Law School. It can be downloaded from the Social Science Research Network site at the link above. The article compares resources available through pay services Lexis/Nexis, Westlaw, CCH, BNA, and RIA. The authors discuss these virtual tax libraries and how they represent an improvement over the brick and mortar version, provided the researcher has the proper skill-set to fully utilize the available tools. Appendixes to the article contain side-by-side comparisons.

Now is the time to beef up tax resources, and this article serves as a handy reference for those wishing to replace books with electronic access. Hat tip to Legal Research Plus for the link.