"Pre" pare Yourself

It’s coming. I can feel the excitement in the tech airwaves. Some pictures of the highly-anticipated Palm Pre cropped up yesterday on Twitter. Although they were quickly removed, you can see them over at EverythingPre. The pictures show the phone navigating the YouTube app and email functions.

Sightings have been cropping up elsewhere as well. But the true harbinger of arrival is ATT’s recent internal memo instructing sales associates how to talk down the Pre and talk up the iPhone, complete with simple-to-understand comparison chart graphics. My favorite talking point: the iPhone has an “on-screen QWERTY keyboard”, while the Pre only has a full QWERTY-keyboard. Stretching it a bit there, boys.

Bring it on, Palm. Bring it on!

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“Pre” pare Yourself

It’s coming. I can feel the excitement in the tech airwaves. Some pictures of the highly-anticipated Palm Pre cropped up yesterday on Twitter. Although they were quickly removed, you can see them over at EverythingPre. The pictures show the phone navigating the YouTube app and email functions.

Sightings have been cropping up elsewhere as well. But the true harbinger of arrival is ATT’s recent internal memo instructing sales associates how to talk down the Pre and talk up the iPhone, complete with simple-to-understand comparison chart graphics. My favorite talking point: the iPhone has an “on-screen QWERTY keyboard”, while the Pre only has a full QWERTY-keyboard. Stretching it a bit there, boys.

Bring it on, Palm. Bring it on!

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The Whacking of Wikipedia, 123

Ten thousand judges can’t be wrong. O.k. Maybe not ten thousand. And maybe some of them can be wrong. But I applaud the very recent New Jersey Appellate Division decision reversing a lower court ruling because it was based, in part, on a Wikipedia entry. The issue in the case, Palisades Collection v. Graubard, a-1338-07, involved identifying the true owner of a credit card debt to ascertain standing to sue. Counsel for the claimant collection agency needed to establish how the collection agency came to own the debt. One of the crucial pieces of evidence establishing the chain of ownership was a Wikipedia entry showing J.P. Morgan Chase’s acqusition of Bank One in 2004.

The Appellate Division was troubled by reliance on Wikipedia,an on-line source that can be edited by anyone and which loudly disclaims security in the contents of any given article and its resemblance to “the state of knowledge in any given field.” The entry was deemed to violate local evidentiary rules, rendering the plaintiff’s case insufficient.

Read the decision and “weep.” http://lawlibrary.rutgers.edu/decisions/appellate/a1338-07.opn.html But don’t say I didn’t tell you so.

Sprechen Sie Deutsch? Dann gehen Sie zum Centre for German Legal Information!

Ever since my first legal research project based on the laws of a foreign jurisdiction and the hell I went through finding the relevant information, I have a special, soft spot in my heart for any on-line resource for foreign laws. The Centre for German Legal Information offers English language links to German court opinions, statutes and general links to government agencies, ministries, courts, bar associations and other legal research collecting sites.

Hat tip to Legal Research Plus for my new bookmark!

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Libraries "Mobilizing" Content For Today's PDA-Enabled Learners


Image via Wikipedia

Thank to Resource Shelf, I found this article by Joan Lippincott, the Associate Director for the Coalition for Networked Information, discussing the implication of mobile technologies and users for academic libraries. As I read through the PDF here, I couldn’t help but analogize to law libraries, informatio professionals and lawyers.

I was pleased to read that academic librarians are aware of how vital and integral these new technologies have become to emerging generations. Children think nothing of turning to the smart-phone or iPod for news, weather and the answer to such questions as whether a tomato is a fruit or vegetable. Rather than cutting young learners completely off from these tools, savvy educators need to recognize how these tools currently are being used and how they can be used to best effect in transferring the right knowledge at the right time. In our fast-paced educational and professional lives, timing truly is everything.

The author points to studies showing that students don’t merely rely on these “toys” for diversion. Instead, students use their mobile technology to support their learning, create and present content and seek out peer support or conference. Mobile devices can be described as “individualized learning environments” that can go anywhere and everywhere with students. For lawyers, these little devices can be tiny warehouses of information, putting codes and statutes, cases and client information at the fingertips.

The author admonishes academic information professionals to actively seek out information about what students and faculty are using and determine how best to partner with them to provide a more seamless flow of information. Some users will be on-campus and require information flow from workstation to workstation, while other users may be remote and be even more dependent upon on-line transfer. Those offering support must determine the tools in order to best package information for those devices.

The big question for me is when will rich content be made available to users on mobile devices? The author notes that such licensing is the narrow exception, rather than rule. As the author points out:

One can imagine offering reference sources for other researchers (students or faculty) in the field, such as those doing agricultural studies,environmental data collection, anthropological work, or social-services work in the community. Such individuals may find ready access to directories, handbooks, and the like to be of great utility in the field.

I can imagine a few attorneys who might be interested in such a live connection to their reference and resource materials.

The author also notes the prolific use of podcasts and audio content for download. Imagine being able to videotape a deposition and immediately be able to transfer through mobile medium to the waiting team of attorneys at another location?

Mobile access means 24-7 access to resources and reference. The question for the information professional (or firm IT department) is “what kind of information do my charges need and how can I best get that information to them?” The author rightly points out that best practices might include introducing students and faculty (and lawyers and support staff) to the available tech and provide instruction and support on how that tech can best be used to secure the required information. For the mobile generation, PDAs, smartphones, iPods and netbooks will likely be the weapon of choice. I for one, am waiting for those who guard the information to package it for mobile consumption.

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Libraries “Mobilizing” Content For Today’s PDA-Enabled Learners


Image via Wikipedia

Thank to Resource Shelf, I found this article by Joan Lippincott, the Associate Director for the Coalition for Networked Information, discussing the implication of mobile technologies and users for academic libraries. As I read through the PDF here, I couldn’t help but analogize to law libraries, informatio professionals and lawyers.

I was pleased to read that academic librarians are aware of how vital and integral these new technologies have become to emerging generations. Children think nothing of turning to the smart-phone or iPod for news, weather and the answer to such questions as whether a tomato is a fruit or vegetable. Rather than cutting young learners completely off from these tools, savvy educators need to recognize how these tools currently are being used and how they can be used to best effect in transferring the right knowledge at the right time. In our fast-paced educational and professional lives, timing truly is everything.

The author points to studies showing that students don’t merely rely on these “toys” for diversion. Instead, students use their mobile technology to support their learning, create and present content and seek out peer support or conference. Mobile devices can be described as “individualized learning environments” that can go anywhere and everywhere with students. For lawyers, these little devices can be tiny warehouses of information, putting codes and statutes, cases and client information at the fingertips.

The author admonishes academic information professionals to actively seek out information about what students and faculty are using and determine how best to partner with them to provide a more seamless flow of information. Some users will be on-campus and require information flow from workstation to workstation, while other users may be remote and be even more dependent upon on-line transfer. Those offering support must determine the tools in order to best package information for those devices.

The big question for me is when will rich content be made available to users on mobile devices? The author notes that such licensing is the narrow exception, rather than rule. As the author points out:

One can imagine offering reference sources for other researchers (students or faculty) in the field, such as those doing agricultural studies,environmental data collection, anthropological work, or social-services work in the community. Such individuals may find ready access to directories, handbooks, and the like to be of great utility in the field.

I can imagine a few attorneys who might be interested in such a live connection to their reference and resource materials.

The author also notes the prolific use of podcasts and audio content for download. Imagine being able to videotape a deposition and immediately be able to transfer through mobile medium to the waiting team of attorneys at another location?

Mobile access means 24-7 access to resources and reference. The question for the information professional (or firm IT department) is “what kind of information do my charges need and how can I best get that information to them?” The author rightly points out that best practices might include introducing students and faculty (and lawyers and support staff) to the available tech and provide instruction and support on how that tech can best be used to secure the required information. For the mobile generation, PDAs, smartphones, iPods and netbooks will likely be the weapon of choice. I for one, am waiting for those who guard the information to package it for mobile consumption.

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Law Journals Find There Is Strength In Numbers

From a Business Wire Press Release, several top law reviews have joined together to create The Legal Workshop – a free, on-line publication collecting articles on legal scholarship originally published in their print editions. The Workshop’s offerings are condensed versions of the original full-length works appearing in the books. They are not abstracts, but rather “tight and light” showcases of the authors’ opinions and findings. The Workshop is hoping that, by making the material easier to digest, the authors and their ideas will find a wider audience. And readers can rest assured that they are viewing serious scholarship by serious legal writers.

The Workshop is the product of and is run by current and former student editors of the law reviews, including Stanford Law Review, New York University Law Review, Cornell Law Review, Duke Law Journal, Georgetown Law Journal, Northwestern Law Review and the University of Chicago Law Review.

Its premise is to reach beyond legal experts and practitioners and awaken the general ‘Net readership to the wonder of Law Reviews and Journals. Too early to tell whether the Workshop will achieve this goal. No matter the outcome, however – I applaud the effort by the students to make legal scholarship accessible to the masses – the very essence of information transfer in today’s plugged-in community!

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Real Financial News, Real Fast

These days on the Web, if it’s not semantic, it’s deep and if it’s not deep it’s real. The true genius of services like Twitter is in the real-time search aspect – if you want to know what people are saying right now about Steven Hawking or Susan Boyle, check out the Twitter stream, search bar or trending topics links.

Now you can get real-time financial news, also for that ever-attractive price, free, at SkyGrid http://www.skygrid.com. SkyGrid collects news stories on publicly-traded companies as they break, real-time, with visual cues as to the weight of the story and author’s bent, red for negative and green for positive. SkyGrid has been transitioning to a free service and is right now in private beta. Related news stories are clustered and users can create their own pages for particular stocks or sectors.

Skygrid does a great job of giving you the real-time news and trending at a glance. Now if they could only expand the great interface into other news arenas.

Hat tip to TechCrunch

ROAD TRIP!!!!!!!!

road-trip

Taking a road trip ain’t what it used to be. Gone are the days of fumbling for directions, settling for McDonalds or searching desperately for a gas station while riding on fumes.The iPhone revolution and Apps Store are upon us, streamlining and civilizing the process.
Mashable’s Ben Parr has a selection of iPhone apps that are particularly suited to customizing your trip. For purposes of this blog, you could replace “road trip” with “business trip” – these apps would do nicely while you are navigating uncharted territory looking for hotels, food or other services. There are apps to track mileage and expenses (Road Trip), weather apps (The Weather Channel), wi-fi hotspot finders (WiFiTrack), food finders (Urban Spoon), recommendations (Yelp), simpler mapping (MapsBuddy), hotel finders (SimulTravel GPS), and places of interest (Where To?). I have used Urban Spoon to find food to good effect, but haven’t personally used the other services mentioned. I would add another app that I use to this list: “Call A Cab” is a free app that finds the local cab services based on your location and gives a quick link to their phone number.
Happy Travels!

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Zamzar – More Conversion Fun

Another tip from Lifehacker, Zamzar offers a text to speech service that converts files or URLs to various audio formats, delivered to your email. This includes TXT, PDF, Word, Works, WordPerfect and OpenOffice documents. Although the delivery is not “silky smooth” per Lifehackers’ review, it does sound better than a robot (what do they have against robots?). Zamzar also offers other conversion combinations and is free, with a 100MB file size limit.

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