Use Motion To Explain Media To The Uninitiated

JISCNeed quick visual explanations of all that the Web has to offer? Why spend the time doing it yourself when you can check out JISC’s animations on subjects ranging from social media, podcasting, RSS feeds, collaborative writing, and microblogging. This vids are created with the rank beginner in mind, so they are perfect for underlining an explanation to the rest of the firm or Bar Association audience about why lawyers need to get hip to new technology and modes of communication.

These are the first few offerings. JISC plans to add more in August, including vids on blogging, social bookmarking, communications, and digital identity.

JISC is composed of senior managers, academics and technology experts working in UK higher education. Its work reflects the present and future needs of the education and research communities. JISC seeks to facilitate collaboration between education and research institutions, with a focus on technology.

Hat tip to ResourceShelf.

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A Slideshow You Will Want To Sit Through

LSNTAPLSNTAP offers up a fantastic slide show of Fifty Tech Tips for Tough Economic Times. The hefty presentation is filled with free and open-source tools and tips on how to make the most of them in your law practice. And these tips are only for the month of July! Download the PowerPoint and sit back and learn a few things you may not have already known about some of your favorites, as well as some new options.

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Kindle Threatens to Become Lawyer's Swiss Army Knife

Image representing Amazon Kindle as depicted i...
Image via CrunchBase

It’s coming, I know it. I called it a year ago. Who wouldn’t rather have their entire library with automatic updates on a roughly 8 by 5 by 1/2″ tablet? The Wall Street Journal ran this article on Friday by Jeffrey Trachtenberg announcing that Practicing Law Institute (“PLI”) is making its law books available on the Kindle. The discounts off hard copy are not as steep for the PLI’s offerings as for other Amazon titles, but they should measure around 20%. The article quotes a VP from a market research firm on why law-on-Kindle makes sense:

“[t]here are a lot of practical reasons to believe that the digital market may well be more profitable for publishers of legal, medical and educational texts,” said Andrew Frank, a vice president at market-research firm Gartner Inc. “Since these texts are reference material, the ability to index them and set up bookmarks, which you can do easily with the Kindle, will save time and money for users.”

With all due respect, Mr. Frank, no duh! The article goes on to explain why the marriage makes sense: easy updates;  the ability to delete old information; portability; search; and, quick links to footnotes

Well over half of PLI’s 90-book catalog are now available. If all goes well, other legal publishers will follow suit and soon you will have a library in your hands that rivals the one at your law school.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Kindle Threatens to Become Lawyer’s Swiss Army Knife

Image representing Amazon Kindle as depicted i...
Image via CrunchBase

It’s coming, I know it. I called it a year ago. Who wouldn’t rather have their entire library with automatic updates on a roughly 8 by 5 by 1/2″ tablet? The Wall Street Journal ran this article on Friday by Jeffrey Trachtenberg announcing that Practicing Law Institute (“PLI”) is making its law books available on the Kindle. The discounts off hard copy are not as steep for the PLI’s offerings as for other Amazon titles, but they should measure around 20%. The article quotes a VP from a market research firm on why law-on-Kindle makes sense:

“[t]here are a lot of practical reasons to believe that the digital market may well be more profitable for publishers of legal, medical and educational texts,” said Andrew Frank, a vice president at market-research firm Gartner Inc. “Since these texts are reference material, the ability to index them and set up bookmarks, which you can do easily with the Kindle, will save time and money for users.”

With all due respect, Mr. Frank, no duh! The article goes on to explain why the marriage makes sense: easy updates;  the ability to delete old information; portability; search; and, quick links to footnotes

Well over half of PLI’s 90-book catalog are now available. If all goes well, other legal publishers will follow suit and soon you will have a library in your hands that rivals the one at your law school.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]