Looking for a GReader Alternative? Try Good Noows

Although I am a die-hard Google Reader fan, it is always nice to welcome a new RSS news reader to the fold and expand the options. Good Noows (link here), a web-based reader, has the slick look of Feedly with lots of customization tools  and social sharing buttons. Interestingly, you cannot sign up for Good Noows directly. Instead, you use your social log-ins from Facebook, Twitter, Google, Yahoo or LinkedIn.

Be aware that, unlike Feedly, Good Noows is not tied to your Google Reader subscriptions. You must select your topics and sources within the application. Your news options do vary based on your location. In addition to the offered choices, you can insert custom feeds from your own favorite sources. Make sure you de-select the default options that you are not interested in, as Good Noows automatically subscribes you to recommended sources, just to get your started.

There are nine different formatting options for your news blurbs, all of which are nicely laid out and easy to navigate. I like the auto-translate feature – click a button to translate your entire page into another language. As with other readers, clicking on the item ultimately sends you through to the original article.

There is searching and filtering within streams for specific terms, which are called “labels” and can be added as buttons for quick access to your desired content.  In addition to the usual sharing options, you can share links from Good Noows in a chat format, powered by Meebo.

If you are a chat junkie, this last feature may make Good Noows a first place choice. For the rest of us, Good Noows might offer a different view of the news and may fit your needs better than the old standby.

5 comments on “Looking for a GReader Alternative? Try Good Noows

  1. Another great post, Martha. Where do you find these tools? :-)Per our discussion on Twitter, I hesitate to use a program that doesn't have a unique login. Though it takes more time, I keep platforms separate. When I cross-post I do it manually. My philosophy is: different audience, different message. So, I never login to one using the credentials of another. I no longer need to. And it's not for privacy issues (I've long given up on that) as much for security reasons. I have similar issues with Google Buzz and Yahoo Updates which tap into your address book contacts without permission. Wish they'd untether these programs.

  2. Thanks, Tim, for stopping by to share your thoughts on this. Interestingly, I find most of my tools using variations on a feed reader theme, some such as Feedly, requiring provision of my Google ID.
    I am of the same mind as you regarding linking social sites – the multiple posting and “echo chamber” effect are issues raised regularly on blogs across the Web. I, as you, try to minimize that effect, keeping most of my activities on separate web sites separate. One exception is Friendfeed (where I feed many streams in) and the other is Posterous (photos only, where I feed out to many sites). This is so that I can use Friendfeed as a true aggregator – a single source for all of my content, and use that one Friendfeed feed out to fill my sidebar here.

    Perhaps the best option would be to give people the option of using either the universal or social log-ins or individual, site-specific log-ins. While it cuts against Web trends moving toward freedom of ubiquitous information and universal connection, it preserves individual choice.

    Cheers!

  3. Thanks, Tim, for stopping by to share your thoughts on this. Interestingly, I find most of my tools using variations on a feed reader theme, some such as Feedly, requiring provision of my Google ID. I am of the same mind as you regarding linking social sites – the multiple posting and “echo chamber” effect are issues raised regularly on blogs across the Web. I, as you, try to minimize that effect, keeping most of my activities on separate web sites separate. One exception is Friendfeed (where I feed many streams in) and the other is Posterous (photos only, where I feed out to many sites). This is so that I can use Friendfeed as a true aggregator – a single source for all of my content, and use that one Friendfeed feed out to fill my sidebar here. Perhaps the best option would be to give people the option of using either the universal or social log-ins or individual, site-specific log-ins. While it cuts against Web trends moving toward freedom of ubiquitous information and universal connection, it preserves individual choice. Cheers!

  4. Another great post, Martha. Where do you find these tools? :-)Per our discussion on Twitter, I hesitate to use a program that doesn't have a unique login. Though it takes more time, I keep platforms separate. When I cross-post I do it manually. My philosophy is: different audience, different message. So, I never login to one using the credentials of another. I no longer need to. And it's not for privacy issues (I've long given up on that) as much for security reasons. I have similar issues with Google Buzz and Yahoo Updates which tap into your address book contacts without permission. Wish they'd untether these programs.

  5. Thanks, Tim, for stopping by to share your thoughts on this. Interestingly, I find most of my tools using variations on a feed reader theme, some such as Feedly, requiring provision of my Google ID. I am of the same mind as you regarding linking social sites – the multiple posting and “echo chamber” effect are issues raised regularly on blogs across the Web. I, as you, try to minimize that effect, keeping most of my activities on separate web sites separate. One exception is Friendfeed (where I feed many streams in) and the other is Posterous (photos only, where I feed out to many sites). This is so that I can use Friendfeed as a true aggregator – a single source for all of my content, and use that one Friendfeed feed out to fill my sidebar here. Perhaps the best option would be to give people the option of using either the universal or social log-ins or individual, site-specific log-ins. While it cuts against Web trends moving toward freedom of ubiquitous information and universal connection, it preserves individual choice. Cheers!

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