Need To Fax? Use Google Docs

Google Docs is ubiquitous and getting moreso with extensions and applications that leverage its cloud-based storage goodness. Take, for example, InterFAX – a fax service that lets you hook up your Google Docs account and use it as a browser-based fax machine! Create an InterFAX account, select external apps and then Google Docs. Click on Activate and the Google Docs page will appear. Grant access to InterFAX (you can select the option to grant access without credentials to keep username private). Enable the “Fax This” bookmarklet, and you are pretty much ready to go. You can send and receive faxes via your Google Docs account, just as you would a fax machine. Received faxes are saved as PDF into a dedicated folder in your Docs account. There is a small cost involved –  as low as $.07 per page and you have to buy credits in minimum installments of $10. But the convenience factor (as well as a cost that is far lower than a dedicated fax line) are very compelling.

Hat tip to Digital Inspiration Technology Blog.

Click.to: The Express Train To Searching & Posting

It’s the little things in life. Five steps to get from words, pics or vids on the screen to search or post on the web, for example. Multiply that over the course of the day and you have spent a considerable amount of time simply getting from point a to point b, over and over and over again. If you could drop that process down to two steps, well then, you are talking some serious time and repetitive stress injury savings.

If you are rocking Windows 7, XP, or Vista, then you are in luck. Click.to, a Windows add-on, will let you do just that. After you load it up, simply select what you want to search or share, hit Control+C and hit the desired destination in the pop-up box. Search by hitting the Google icon, or share on Facebook with the Facebook icon. There are way more options than that, including insertion into Outlook, Word or Excel, or click to convert to PDF.

If you Mac users are feeling left out, never fear. Click.to’s developer says that a Mac version is in the works and hopefully will be coming soon.

I just love little time savers like this. After using Click.to, you may never go back to the old select, copy, open, insert, and go/post  process ever again.

Cloud Docs + Printing with Google Docs + FedEx

Trying to print out one of your cloud-scriven Google Doc(ument) without an attached printer? Looking at that Airprint button with frustration because you can’t get your docs from your phone to your hands? Well, fret no more – if you are a Google Docs user that needs to kill a tree, then FedEx has your back. Called Office Print OnLine, FedEx will enable you to either upload from your computer or share a Doc from Google Docs (after giving FedEx access to your Docs account). You can then either pick the doc up at your local FedEx location, or have it delivered to you at extra charge. The extra extra that your own printer can’t match is the ability to order folding, laminating or binding along with your printing. And the costs appear somewhat reasonable, with a couple bucks for a couple pages for pick up.

When it absolutely, positively, has to be printed in ink on pulp, then consider Google Docs and FedEx – you can have your doc and print it too.

Hat tip to MakeUseOf – the images are theirs too.

Tabulaw – A Drafting Tool With A Legal Bent


Whew! Gone for a few days as I dug myself out from a pile of work (the paying kind). Perhaps if I had a software tool that combined my legal research efforts and results with a simple, effective sharing and composition tool, I could whip out those opinion letters and research projects faster and more efficiently. Wait – you say there is something like that out there? Have you heard of Tabulaw?

Tabulaw is a web-based service that combines all of the tasks of researching and communicating a point of law into a simple copy / drag / drop interface. Tabulaw is the glue for your other resources and tasks – it appears that it will work with Google, Westlaw, Lexis/Nexis, and perhaps other databases (here’s hoping for Fastcase), allow you to copy and save sections of research, along with their appropriate citations, which are then available to you to drag and drop into your final document. I really like the idea of aggregating from different sources into one, citable “notebook” of content that can then be manipulated and shared. As far as the collaboration element, I am not sure how they intend to implement this – it would be uber cool to make these research folders open to multiple contributors, along with traditional social sharing or direct links to Scribd or Slideshare.

Tabulaw is in private beta and I don’t have an invite so I haven’t yet tested it myself. But you can bet that I signed up for the beta. If I get in, I will get back with more info on this promising tool. In the meantime, check out their promo video below.

Stylus, Pen & Laser Pointer. What Else Would You Need?

This little tool has “lawyer” written all over it. All the “sharpest” attorneys will be sporting one in their inner suit pocket. Grab yours today from Griffin.

The Evolution of the Web

This is so gorgeous, I couldn’t wait until tomorrow to write about it. Hyperakt has created a beautiful, interactive application that showcases the Evolution of the Web, specifically browser and web based technologies. The explanation from the site:

The web today is a growing universe of interlinked web pages and web apps, teeming with videos, photos, and interactive content. What the average user doesn’t see is the interplay of web technologies and browsers that makes all this possible.

Over time web technologies have evolved to give web developers the ability to create new generations of useful and immersive web experiences. Today’s web is a result of the ongoing efforts of an open web community that helps define these web technologies, like HTML5, CSS3 and WebGL and ensure that they’re supported in all web browsers.

The color bands in this visualization represent the interaction between web technologies and browsers, which brings to life the many powerful web apps that we use daily.

The app scrolls open to reveal a timeline with your favorite browser badge at the appropriate spot on the continuum. Click on the badge and get more information about it. The app comes in several languages and there is an incredible breadth of information available if you click all the links. The take-away is that a whole lot has happened in web development in a relatively short time – and development appears to be moving faster all the time. Can you imagine the infographic  / visual application needed to document this information in ten more years?

Happy browsing!