From The Clever Tip Box: Save Twitter Info Using Tweetdeck and Evernote

Image representing TweetDeck as depicted in Cr...
Image via CrunchBase

My problem with Twitter, which I am guessing is shared,  is that the information blasts past like leaves floating on a raging river, making it difficult to pull and save the wothwhile bits. Sure you can “star” tweets and then go back later to manually collect. But I saw this on Lifehacker this morning and think it is a fabulous tip:  send and save the valuable Twitter tweets using Tweetdeck and Evernote.

Tweetdeck is great for sifting through the torrent to find the gold in the first instance. Tweetdeck also allows you to email tweets via your own email client. Evernote permits notating via email – provided you are using Evernote’s universal capture system. You can then stream to RSS, your phone client or your desktop RSS reader. Automatic for the people!

Thanks Steve Ruble (East Coast Blogging) and Lifehacker for the nice suggestion.

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Use Motion To Explain Media To The Uninitiated

JISCNeed quick visual explanations of all that the Web has to offer? Why spend the time doing it yourself when you can check out JISC’s animations on subjects ranging from social media, podcasting, RSS feeds, collaborative writing, and microblogging. This vids are created with the rank beginner in mind, so they are perfect for underlining an explanation to the rest of the firm or Bar Association audience about why lawyers need to get hip to new technology and modes of communication.

These are the first few offerings. JISC plans to add more in August, including vids on blogging, social bookmarking, communications, and digital identity.

JISC is composed of senior managers, academics and technology experts working in UK higher education. Its work reflects the present and future needs of the education and research communities. JISC seeks to facilitate collaboration between education and research institutions, with a focus on technology.

Hat tip to ResourceShelf.

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Keeping Tabs on the C-Suite, Twitter-Style

Here is an innovative real-time information filter for business-oriented Twitter-holics: ExecTweets. ExecTweets is a beta site offering the tweets of the movers and shakers, the captains of industry and the power play-makers across sectors. Backed by Microsoft (who else?), the site has this to say about itself:

ExecTweets is a resource to help you find and follow the top business executives on Twitter. Created by Federated Media, in partnership with Microsoft, ExecTweets is a platform that aggregates the tweets of top business execs and empowers the community to surface the most insightful, business-related tweets.

ExecTweets is also available as a  free iPhone application, offering organization by topic, popularity and industry. I was going to copy the list of participating executives, but the list truly is too long! Hit the jump to their site above to see the “wealth” of information. Instead, check out this list of hot topics on ExecTweets as of the time of publishing this post:

I notice a glaring absence of posts on MJ. How refreshing!
ExecTweets
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Advocate’s Studio: Traveling Under Your Radar!

I cannot express how pleased I was to discover yesterday that one of my absolute favorite blogs included the Studio on a list of Five Blogs Under The Radar: May  2009 Edition. Louis Gray is a tech blogger at his site louisgray.com where, since 2006, he has “express[ed his] personal observations on the world of technology, the Web, and innovation.” Check out his About page for the “why” of my deep appreciation for his content as well as my feeling of great honor at being included.

My impression of Mr. Gray’s blogging agenda is one of intelligence, integrity and impartiality.  He understands what his readers are looking for and why it is necessary to secure their respect. In kind, his readers do respect him and his points of view. I have cited to Mr. Gray before on the Studio and I regularly read his posts – not just to secure content leads but, more importantly, to actually learn something new and satisfy my curious nature!

Thank you, Louis, for the mention and I hope to continue providing content in the Studio that meets your high standards! And for Studio readers looking for intelligent, in-depth evaluation and analysis of tech-related subject matter — run, don’t walk, to louisgray.com.

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Advocate's Studio: Traveling Under Your Radar!

I cannot express how pleased I was to discover yesterday that one of my absolute favorite blogs included the Studio on a list of Five Blogs Under The Radar: May  2009 Edition. Louis Gray is a tech blogger at his site louisgray.com where, since 2006, he has “express[ed his] personal observations on the world of technology, the Web, and innovation.” Check out his About page for the “why” of my deep appreciation for his content as well as my feeling of great honor at being included.

My impression of Mr. Gray’s blogging agenda is one of intelligence, integrity and impartiality.  He understands what his readers are looking for and why it is necessary to secure their respect. In kind, his readers do respect him and his points of view. I have cited to Mr. Gray before on the Studio and I regularly read his posts – not just to secure content leads but, more importantly, to actually learn something new and satisfy my curious nature!

Thank you, Louis, for the mention and I hope to continue providing content in the Studio that meets your high standards! And for Studio readers looking for intelligent, in-depth evaluation and analysis of tech-related subject matter — run, don’t walk, to louisgray.com.

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Honor Among Bloggers

A Soap Box.
Image by MonsieurLui via Flickr

Yesterday, I read something that riled me up. A tech blog post with an inflammatory title designed to ensure click-through and “opinionated” content marginally “based” on “facts” with an equally inflammatory bent. On a well-respected and highly viewed tech blog.  The post was dressed up like a “tech” review, but in reality served as a “hot poker” to get readers to hit it and come back repeatedly to check the comments for more outrageousness. The blog author kept the craziness going by answering challenges in the comments with additional “facts” he failed to mention in the original post.

This post reminded me of a similar post that I read last fall – another in which the writing was clearly designed to encourage readers to enter the fray and even post comments in outrage because of the over-the-top nature of the post and its equally poor writing.

I am not going to link to the post here, because I am not interested in encouraging more “hits” on it and in rewarding the writer for a job poorly done. One reason that bloggers engage in such tactics is to inflate hits and statistics, measures which affect revenues for a blog that relies on hits and clicks to increase its income.

I surely don’t begrudge anyone their income opportunities, as long as they are not hurting anyone in the process. Are these manipulaters hurting anyone here? Umm, yes!  Whether they choose to be or not, bloggers populate the new wave of journalism. The advent of blogging has dramatically changed the way in which people receive their “news.” Blogging has changed the face of traditional news outlets. More and more readers have shifted reliance on traditional news outlets to bloggers for cutting-edge information, particularly on cutting-edge topics.When readers believe they are receiving quality and are instead fed drivel, it breaches reasonable expectations of validity, bringing our profession down in the process.

Journalists adhere to a code of ethics, through the Society of Professional Journalists. I thought I might quote some of it here:

Seek Truth and Report It
Journalists should be honest, fair and courageous in gathering, reporting and interpreting information.

*   *   *

— Make certain that headlines, news teases and promotional material, photos, video, audio, graphics, sound bites and quotations do not misrepresent. They should not oversimplify or highlight incidents out of context.

*   *   *

— Distinguish between advocacy and news reporting. Analysis and commentary should be labeled and not misrepresent fact or context.
— Distinguish news from advertising and shun hybrids that blur the lines between the two.

There are reasons for ethical codes. When people perceive that a practice has the power to harm, they rightly craft a set of “rules” to ensure protection of those who could be subject to the foul play that misuse of power can wreak. Lawyers have a code of ethics. Journalists have a code of ethics. Cyber Journalist has proposed a blogger code of ethics as well. The admonitions make sense. Here is the proposed Code in its entireity:

Be Honest and Fair
Bloggers should be honest and fair in gathering, reporting and interpreting information.
Bloggers should:
• Never plagiarize.
• Identify and link to sources whenever feasible. The public is entitled to as much information as possible on sources’ reliability.
• Make certain that Weblog entries, quotations, headlines, photos and all other content do not misrepresent. They should not oversimplify or highlight incidents out of context.
• Never distort the content of photos without disclosing what has been changed. Image enhancement is only acceptable for for technical clarity. Label montages and photo illustrations.
• Never publish information they know is inaccurate — and if publishing questionable information, make it clear it’s in doubt.
• Distinguish between advocacy, commentary and factual information. Even advocacy writing and commentary should not misrepresent fact or context.
• Distinguish factual information and commentary from advertising and shun hybrids that blur the lines between the two.

Minimize Harm
Ethical bloggers treat sources and subjects as human beings deserving of respect.
Bloggers should:
• Show compassion for those who may be affected adversely by Weblog content. Use special sensitivity when dealing with children and inexperienced sources or subjects.
• Be sensitive when seeking or using interviews or photographs of those affected by tragedy or grief.
• Recognize that gathering and reporting information may cause harm or discomfort. Pursuit of information is not a license for arrogance.
• Recognize that private people have a greater right to control information about themselves than do public officials and others who seek power, influence or attention. Only an overriding public need can justify intrusion into anyone’s privacy.
• Show good taste. Avoid pandering to lurid curiosity.
Be cautious about identifying juvenile suspects, victims of sex crimes and criminal suspects before the formal filing of charges.

Legal bloggers may already be sensitive to many of these concerns. Their reasons for blogging differ from those bloggers who make their money from hits and click-throughs. Legal bloggers undertake blogging to showcase their expertise, make connections and earn trust and respect from peers and clients. I would imagine  (and hope) that the incidence of “sensational” headlines and outrageous assertions would be either zero or none on law blogs. I only wish that such irresponsible conduct could be limited to blogs that pander to the National Enquirer crowd – far away from blogs that profess to provide valid news and reviews on tech matters or other professional subjects.

Reserve wild assertions and crazy opinions for the cocktail party or Twitter, Friendfeed or any of the social media outlets where they clearly will be viewed as opinion. Remember your footprint when you blog and, hopefully, your content will add to the blogosphere, rather than detract from it.

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